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Raphael

Robert Cross Smith (1795-1832) was an English astrologer, writing under the pseudonym of “Raphael“.

Smith was born in Bristol on March 19, 1795. He married in 1820 and moved to London, where he became interested in astrology. Together with G. W. Graham, he published a book on geomancy in 1822.

Smith began to edit a periodical entitled The Struggling Astrologer in 1824, but failed to receive enough subscribers and the periodical had to be discontinued after a few issues. He collected the issues of the failed periodical in a volume entitled The Astrologer Of The Nineteenth Century in the same year. The volume claimed to be the “sixth edition”, but it is believed that editions one to five never existed. A substantially enlarged edition appeared in 1825 as the “seventh edition”, with additional material attributed to “Merlinus Anglicus Junior” (Merlinus Anglicus Junior: The English Merlin Revived was the title of a 1644 book by William Lilly). It was printed by Knight & Lacey of London.

From 1827 until his death in 1832, he edited an astrological almanac, entitled The Prophetic Messenger. Also published by Smith was The Familiar Astrologer and A Manual of Astrology, both in 1828.

Smith died on 26 February 1832 in London. His almanac continued to be edited as Raphael’s Ephemeris and would become a standard work in British and US American astrology. Raphael’s Ephemeris popularized the system of Placidian system of astrological houses in the English-speaking world and in modern western astrology in general.

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Alan Leo

Alan Leo

Alan Leo, born William Frederick Allan, (Westminster, 7 August 1860 – Bude, 30 August 1917), was a prominent British astrologer, author, publisher, astrological data collector and theosophist. He is often referred to as “the father of modern astrology”.

His work stimulated a revival of astrology in the Western world after its decline at the end of the 17th century. Leo was a devout theosophist and he worked many of its religious concepts such as karma and reincarnation into his astrology. He used the Theosophical Society’s vast international connections to publish, translate and disseminate his work across Europe and America.

Astrological technique and influence

Leo, who took the name of his sun-sign as a pseudonym, is credited with starting the movement towards a more psychologically-oriented horoscope analysis in astrology, being the first astrologer to argue for a loose interpretation of possible trends of experience rather than the specific prediction of events. His influence has been described as marking a ‘turning point’ in horoscope delineation, because, as astrological historian James Holden explains:

Thereafter, what has been more recently called “event-oriented” astrology gradually receded in favor of character analysis and vague descriptions of possible areas of psychological harmony or stress.

In 1890, Leo, invited George R.S. Mead to found an occult lodge in Brixton, South London. Towards the end of his life, in 1909, and again in 1911, Leo travelled with his wife to India where he studied Indian astrology. As a result of his studies in India, he later attempted to incorporate portions of Indian astrology into the western astrological model.

Leo’s book The Art of Synthesis (1912) was a probable influence on Gustav Holst’s work The Planets. In this book, Leo gave the planets descriptions such as “Mars the Energiser”.

In 1915 Leo founded the Astrological Lodge of London.

Legal controversies and death

In 1914, aged 54, Leo faced prosecution against the charge that he “did unlawfully pretend to tell fortunes” through astrology. The case was dismissed for lack of evidence, but it led to Leo’s belief that astrology needed to be revised to be legitimised. His advice to fellow astrologers was:

Let us part company with the fatalistic astrologer who prides himself on his predictions and who is ever seeking to convince the world that in the predictive side of Astrology alone shall we find its value. We need not argue the point as to its reality, but instead make a much-needed change in the word and call Astrology the science of tendencies.

In 1917 Leo stood trial again on a similar charge. Despite his insistence that he told only “tendencies” and not “fortunes”, he lost his case and was fined £5 plus costs. Leo was convicted of fortune-telling on 16 July 1917. He died a few weeks later from an apoplexy (cerebral haemorrhage), at 10:00 am on 30 August 1917, whilst on a holiday at Bude in Cornwall, which was intended to restore his health after the ordeals of the trial. He had used the ‘holiday’ as a period in which he rewrote hundreds of pages of astrological text to “recast the whole system and make it run more along the lines of character reading and less as the assertion of an inevitable destiny”, despite being warned by his wife that “he needed rest badly after the worry and anxiety of the law case”, and was overworking himself and heading for a breakdown. After his sudden death the rewriting of his work was completed by his friend and colleague H.S. Greene. Greene also remarked on how the 1917 prosecution had caused worry for Leo during the process of the trial.

Works

  • Practical Astrology.
  • The Astrologer’s Magazine, edited by Alan Leo, Vol. IV (1894) Vol. V series 1895
  • What is the Horoscope and How is it Cast. N.p., 1902.
  • How to Judge a Nativity. 2 vols. 1904. Reprint, London: Modern Astrology Office, 1928.
  • Astrology for All series 1903–.
  • The Progressed Horoscope. London: Fowler 1906.
  • Horary Astrology. London: Modern Astrology Office, 1909.
  • The Key to your own Nativity. London: Modern Astrology Office, 1910.
  • The Art of Synthesis. Originally published 1912 as “How to Judge a Nativity” in the Astrology for All series. London: Fowler 1968.
  • Casting the Horoscope. London: Modern Astrology Office, 1912.
  • Esoteric Astrology, first published 1913. Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, 1989.
  • Alan Leo’s Dictionary of Astrology, edited and completed by Vivian E. Robson. London 1929.
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Sepharial

Dr Walter Gorn Old, born 20 March 1864 in Handsworth, England; died 23 December 1929 in Hove, England) was a notable 19th-century astrologer, who used the nom-de-plume “Sepharial”, after an angel in the apocryphal Book of Enoch.

An eminent English Theosophist, Sepharial was a well-known and respected astrologer in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and wrote numerous books, some of which are still highly regarded in some circles today. He was editor of “Old Moore’s Almanac”, which is still published in the 21st century.

Overview

As a young man Sepharial initially studied medicine and followed this up with studies in psychology, oriental languages, astrology and numerology. In 1886, he started to write an astrology problem page in the Society Times where he answered public questions, and in 1887 was admitted to the “inner sanctum” of the Theosophical Society. He was one of the founding members of the Theosophical movement in England. Madame Blavatsky (whom he lived with until her death) called him “The Astral Tramp”.

Legacy

Sepharial became an influential author in the fields of the occult, astrology and numerology, and his writings had a considerable impact on Alfred H. Barley and Alan Leo, who he introduced to Theosophy. He can be credited as the first astrologer to use Earth’s hypothetical “dark moon” Lilith in his calculations. Many of his books and other works were put together in a rather slapdash way, which made his reputation less enduring than it might have been. Sepharial also started a number of astrological magazines, all of which failed to establish themselves.

Books

Sepharial wrote many books, most of which are rare and out of print, including the following:

  • Sepharial: “New Dictionary of Astrology”,  New York in 1964.
  • Sepharial: “The New Manual of Astrology” (in four books).
  • Sepharial: “Astrology Explained”.
  • Sepharial: “The Book Of The Simple Way” Pub 1904.
  • Sepharial: “The Kabala of Numbers” Pub 1913.
  • Sepharial: “The Silver Key”.
  • Sepharial: “Cosmic Symbolism”.
  • Sepharial: “Science of Foreknowledge”.
  • Sepharial and Charubel: “Degrees of the Zodiac Symbolised” (on astrology).
  • Sepharial: “A Manual of Occultism”.
  • Sepharial: “Astrology: How To Make Your Own Horoscope”
  • Sepharial: “The Arcana Or Stock And Share Key”
  • Sepharial: “The Law of Values: An Exposition of the Primary Causes of Stock and Share Fluctuations”
  • Sepharial: “The Theory of Geodetic Equivalents”
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H. Emilie Cady

H_Emilie_Cady

Harriet Emilie Cady (July 12, 1848 – January 3, 1941) was an American homeopathic physician and author of New Thought spiritual writings. Her 1896 book Lessons in Truth, A Course of Twelve Lessons in Practical Christianity is now considered one of the core texts on Unity Church teachings. It is the most widely read book in that movement. It has sold over 1.6 million copies since its first publication, and has been translated into eleven languages and braille.

Biography

She was born on July 12, 1848, in Dryden, New York, to Oliver Barlow Cady and Cornelia A. Philips. Cady’s first job was as a schoolteacher in a one-room schoolhouse in her hometown. In the late 1860s, she decided to pursue the field of medicine, and enrolled in the Homeopathic Medical College of the State of New York. She graduated in 1871 and became one of the first woman physicians in America.

Spiritual development and writing career

Introduced to the teachings of Albert Benjamin Simpson, Cady became deeply involved in spiritual and metaphysical studies. She was inspired and influenced by Biblical teachings and the philosophy of Ralph Waldo Emerson. She was taught by Emma Curtis Hopkins, the New Thought “teacher of teachers” and a student of Christian Science and Mary Baker Eddy.

Cady associated with several prominent figures in the New Thought movement of the time, including: Emma Curtis Hopkins, Divine Science minister Emmet Fox, Ernest Holmes, founder of Religious Science, and Charles and Myrtle Fillmore, co-founders of Unity Church. Finding The Christ in Ourselves, a pamphlet she had written and sent unsolicited to Charles and Myrtle Fillmore, was published by them in the October 1891 issue of Thought. Beginning in 1892, a series of articles titled Lessons in Truth by Dr. Cady were published in Unity magazine. This material later was compiled into a book and was the first book Unity published.

Death

Cady died January 3, 1941, in Manhattan, New York City.

Books

  • Lessons in Truth, A Course of Twelve Lessons in Practical Christianity
  • How I Used Truth
  • God, a present help
  • The Complete Works of H. Emilie Cady
  • Coming into Freedom: Emilie Cady’s Lessons in Truth for the 21st Century Ruth L. Miller Pd.D.